Chi Running Advanced Technique Workshop

This workshop will deliver a deeper understanding of the Chi Running principles and components and assess your level of skill and competence in the Chi Running technique. the workshop includes:

  • Video observation covering the key points of efficient biomechanical movement
  • Breath work for physical fitness and sports performance based on the Oxygen Advantage breathing method and heat rate variability (HRV)
  • Postural work with consideration to physical structure and emotional influence
  • The effects of rhythm and cycles of the body including circadian rhythm and menstrual cycle
  • An understanding of the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems and how and when to use
  • Best practices in developing a training programme
  • Life-time access to Online Training materials with video tutorials on basic anatomy and physiology, Oxygen Advantage breathing exercises, functional movement and core strength exercises complementary to running.

This is great if you are considering becoming a Chi Instructor or if you simply want to take your Chi Running to the next level. If, after attending this workshop, you decide to go on to complete the Instructor Training Programme, the cost of this workshop will be deducted from the total cost of the Instructor Training programme.

Will core training help my running?

Will core training help my running?

Hannah Kirkman, our senior coach in the Southwest of England addresses the questions that what many runners are asking regarding the core; what actually is it and how do we train it?

Your running core

 The core, huh, what is it good for? Absolutely… quite a lot actually.

 As humans, we stand and walk on two feet, head balanced on top of the tall tower of our spinal column. Something we take for granted, but which is no easy task to achieve. Ask any toddler.

 To give us the freedom to move in this upright position, we’re not solid bone between ribcage and pelvis. Instead, our core muscles act as a ‘pseudo-skeleton’, helping to stabilise the spine, protect our vital organs, and keep those same organs, as well as bodily fluids, where they’re supposed to be, while we walk, run, jump, dance, or whatever.

 And the core is more than just a bit of scaffolding to hold us upright. It’s also smart. Our deep core muscles are packed full of sensors that are constantly telling our central nervous system where we are in space and how we’re moving. So when we suddenly need to swerve to avoid tripping over a tree root, it can step in to stabilise us before our conscious mind has even had time to register what’s going on.

 In running, we up the ante, demanding of our body that it balances on one leg and then the other, over and over in rapid succession. Without integrity in our structure, we collapse, losing efficiency and potentially risking injury. Just watch runners at the end of a marathon to see what happens when core muscles get tired.

 And ChiRunners? We ask even more from our core: to hold us relaxed and stable as we subtly fall forward, so we can cooperate with gravity and useless leg work to move us. Lose our structure, and we’re back to pushing and pulling with our legs.

 Read the full article on Hannah’s website…

 

 

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You’ll receive regular emails of ideas, articles and opportunities related to health and fitness – along with access to a private Facebook group where you can benefit from the accountability, support, knowledge and experience of like-minded people. We hope you find it a useful and inspiring place to be – we do!

Slow doesn’t have to be sluggish

Slow doesn’t have to be sluggish

Get skipping to improve fitness and running

A slow pace doesn’t mean a sluggish run. Rhythm is the key to maintaining power at a slower pace. Your underlying rhythm when running should be your cadence. That is your stride rate.

You can find your current cadence by setting a timer for 30 seconds and run at a comfortable speed. Count the number of times your right heel lifts off the floor and multiply this by 4.

Make a note of your current cadence. If it’s under 170bpm then there’s definitely room for improvement and by quickening your cadence you’ll soon see the benefits in your running.

As a general rule, your cadence (regardless of pace) should be between 170-180 beats per minute. If you are below this then you are spending too much time on the ground so it will take you more work to get off the ground.

Check out this simple test 

  1. Stand on one leg for about 30 seconds to a minute and then swap sides
  2. Take quick light steps on the spot, balancing on one leg whilst peeling the heal of the other and quickly changing from leg to leg.

Which is easier? I’m guessing you’ll say 2 as you are spending less time on the support leg, less time having to balance and therefore less ‘muscle work’.

All you do now is add the power of gravity, ground force, and momentum to this idea. This gives you a light, quick cadence in your running that optimises natural elastic energy.

A 170-180 cadence will activate this natural elastic energy. Think of skipping.

Skipping is a great way to improve your cadence in preparation for running along with your fitness too. You don’t need a rope either. Just skip on the spot. 

One study shows [1] ‘that healthy runners who increase cadence by 5% should experience decreases in plantar loading that may be associated with lower extremity injuries’. 

Another study [2] showed that increasing cadence in both a minimalist and control shoe reduced stress and reaction force on the knee joint.

Such studies suggest that optimal cadence can reduce the risk of injury.

Here’s a great focus from senior instructor Nick Constantine

“imagine running over a hot surface, try to stop your feet from touching the ground. Avoid balls of feet, just think ‘tap and kiss the ground, not strike the ground, or hit the ground’ minimal noise is a good indication of lightness and reduced contact time.” 

Check out also this excellent article that Nick has written on skipping.

Now you’ve set your constant cadence, synchronise a smooth, rhythmical, nasal breathing pattern to this, keeping it light and easy.

Avoid forcing anything and simply feel the power of natural rhythm settling into the body. You’ll soon feel a sense of being ‘in the zone’.

References

[1] The Effects of Running Cadence Manipulation on Plantar Loading in Healthy Runners. J. Wellenkotter, T. W. Kernozek, S. Meardon, T. Suchomel. Int J Sports Med 2014; 35(09): 779-784. DOI: 10.1055/s-0033-1363236 https://www.thieme-connect.com/products/ejournals/html/10.1055/s-0033-1363236

[2] Bonacci, Jason, Michelle Hall, Aaron Fox, Natalie Saunders, Tristan Shipsides, and Bill Vicenzino. ‘The Influence of Cadence and Shoes on Patellofemoral Joint Kinetics in Runners with Patellofemoral Pain’. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 21, no. 6 (June 2018): 574–78. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2017.09.593.

Sign up to our mailing list

You’ll receive regular emails of ideas, articles and opportunities related to health and fitness – along with access to a private Facebook group where you can benefit from the accountability, support, knowledge and experience of like-minded people. We hope you find it a useful and inspiring place to be – we do!

Chi Running Advanced Technique Workshop

This workshop will deliver a deeper understanding of the Chi Running principles and components and assess your level of skill and competence in the Chi Running technique. the workshop includes:

  • Video observation covering the key points of efficient biomechanical movement
  • Breath work for physical fitness and sports performance based on the Oxygen Advantage breathing method and heat rate variability (HRV)
  • Postural work with consideration to physical structure and emotional influence
  • The effects of rhythm and cycles of the body including circadian rhythm and menstrual cycle
  • An understanding of the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems and how and when to use
  • Best practices in developing a training programme
  • Life-time access to Online Training materials with video tutorials on basic anatomy and physiology, Oxygen Advantage breathing exercises, functional movement and core strength exercises complementary to running.

This is great if you are considering becoming a Chi Instructor or if you simply want to take your Chi Running to the next level. If, after attending this workshop, you decide to go on to complete the Instructor Training Programme, the cost of this workshop will be deducted from the total cost of the Instructor Training programme.

Chi Running Instructor Training

Join our growing team of Chi Running Instructors

Do you love to run? Would you love to share that passion with others? The Chi Running Instructor Training Programme will help you hone your Chi Running technique, and provide you with the skills and tools to coach others. As a qualified Chi Running Instructor you will enjoy a wonderful business opportunity, becoming part of a growing network dedicated to inspiring and empowering runners of all levels.

The Chi Running Instructor Training Programme comprises…

  • Access to a comprehensive Online Training Course and teaching materials
  • Four days of practical workshops including Advanced Technique and Teacher Training Workshops
  • Two one-to-one sessions with the UK Director, delivered online or in-person.

For more details and to book your place check out our dedicated Teach It page

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